Archadeck of Central SC discusses the “beauty and the beast” of decking materials: Ipe Brazilian Hardwood

Ipe Brazilian hardwood deck with metal railing.

Ipe Brazilian hardwood deck with metal railing.

The phone is ringing here at Archadeck of Central SC and many of the inquiries we are receiving are from homeowners wanting to learn more about Brazilian hardwoods, especially Ipe. As this beautiful material gets more exposure from home & garden magazines, TV and image media sites such as Houzz, we, too, are seeing an increased interest from homeowners wanting to use it for their own outdoor structure projects.

This screened porch features an Ipe floor.

This screened porch features an Ipe floor.

What is Ipe?

Ipe (pronounced EE-pay) is one of the finest quality wood decking materials available. A Brazilian hardwood, also commonly referred to as “ironwood” because of its natural resistance to rot and decay, Ipe comes from a group of trees from the species Tabebuia. These trees are primarily found in Central and South America but primarily grow in Brazil. All the Ipe we use on our projects comes from responsibly-harvested and well-managed forests to provide you with a truly renewable resource.

Ipe-Swatches-300x550Strong & Beautiful

Ipe is also considered by many to be “the beauty and the beast” of decking materials because of its tough, resilient properties and unique, exotic look.  Along with being incredibly durable, it’s also naturally resistant to rot, decay, wet conditions, and infestation by termites and borers. Additionally, it has a Class A fire rating — the same rating given to concrete and steel. This material is so strong, in fact,  that installation may require pre-drilling holes prior to assembly to keep the integrity of the boards intact. Even though Ipe is a natural hardwood, it has properties that make it one of the toughest and longest-lasting decking materials available. The famous Atlantic City Boardwalk is even built from Ipe because it also holds up beautifully under extreme traffic and heavy use. Ipe is generally sealed or stained to retain its rich amber hue. If left untreated, Ipe will still retain its longevity and many of its benefits but will fade to an elegant dove gray over time. Keep in mind the surface of an Ipe outdoor structure, if open to the elements,  must be treated every year to maintain its beautiful, rich appearance.

IPE poolside deck.

Ipe poolside deck.

Perfect by the Pool 

This material is perfectly suited for use near water where other materials fall short. Ipe is so dense that it doesn’t rot or decay making it an obvious material choice for docks, pool decks and waterside decks.

 The use of Ipe is not new to the realm of outdoor living structures. Disney parks have frequently use Ipe as an outdoor space building material, and parts of the iconic Coney Island boardwalk are built from Ipe wood. 

Ipe deck with outdoor kitchen

Ipe pool deck with outdoor kitchen.An Ipe deck will last a minimum of 25 ye

Hardwood decks offer a beautiful natural appearance that complements the outdoors. Archadeck of Central SC can help explore all your decking options while keeping your budget and personal tastes in mind. Contact us today to help create your ultimate outdoor experience with a new deck! (803) 603–2160
centralsc@archadeck.net

Archadeck of Central SC three generations of quality outdoor structures

The Archadeck of Central SC team – Mike Reu, Marshall Reu and Tucker Reu

Please visit our wooden decks photo gallery, hardwood decks photo gallery and Ipe decks photo gallery located on our website for more examples of the natural beauty of our wooden decks.

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